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A Window-side View into the World of Wasps

Sep 15, 2014 04:22 PM EDT
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A colony of wasps recently began constructing their intricate home on the outside of a wide attic window, giving the unfortunate (or fortunate?) home owner a unique cross-sectional view of a wasp nest in action.
(Photo : Flickr: Danny Chapman)

A colony of wasps recently began constructing their intricate home on the outside of a wide attic window, giving the unfortunate (or fortunate?) home owner a unique cross-sectional view of a wasp nest in action.

As things stand, the YouTuber Vang Tsal hasn't had the insects removed just yet.

"Big wasps are building a huge nest in my window," he excitedly wrote with his first upload. "I can observe its construction in real-time cross-section!"

He's clearly just having a grant time uploading new and stunning videos as the hive grows, giving us some exceptionally unique views of these wasps at work in the environment they naturally adapted to. But it remains to be seen if he's thinking about any potential damage this could be causing to the outside of his house.

[Credit: Vang Tsal via YouTube]

And while it remains unclear exactly what kind of insects we're looking at, it's pretty clear that these are Vespids - wasps in varying size and shape that use paper and wood pulp to build impressive hexagonal cone nests.

Paper wasps, yellow jackets and hornets are all Vespid wasps, but it might be safest to assume that these are yellow jackets or hornets (likely European hornets), as paper wasps traditionally build smaller nests that are more open.

In all three cases, the nests are built by workers scraping wood and collected paper into a pulp that is then treated like a sort of fast-drying clay - the perfect building material for a temporary summer home.

Amazingly, queen Vespids are the only wasps that winter - making a new nest every year at a new location. Knowing this, Tsal could of course just wait it out. With autumn fast approaching, his new housemates may be departing shortly.

However, not every case of a Vespid home invasion can just be waited out. Last month a woman and her son discovered that one of their little-used guestroom beds had become the massive nest of an estimated 5,000 wasps.

"The pillow was covered in this three foot wasp nest and they were still busy building the nest," Pest-control expert John Birkett, who handled the case, told Mail Online. "If someone had gone in to the room and not known what it was it would have been pretty serious."

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