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Burt's Bees Lip Balm: The New Way to Get High (VIDEO)

Apr 30, 2014 09:35 AM EDT
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Burt's Bees lip balm
Teenagers are reportedly putting Burt's Bees lip balm on their eyelids to enhance their overall inebriated experience.

(Photo : Flickr)

Teenagers are reportedly putting Burt's Bees lip balm on their eyelids to enhance their overall inebriated experience.

The new fad, called "Beezin," creates a tingling sensation from the balm's peppermint oil that supposedly makes their already drunk or high state of mind that much more exciting, according to Fox television affiliate KOKH-TV in Oklahoma City. Some even use it to help them stay alert after a late night.

A doctor at the Today Clinic in Oklahoma City, Okla., said that teenagers may find it funny, but the effect could be dangerous - especially given the eye is the most sensitive part of the body.

"The peppermint oil in the lip balm is a very strong irritant and can cause inflammation in the eye redness of the eye swelling," Dr. Brett Cauthen told KOKH.

The practice could also lead to a more serious risk of infection, especially if someone uses lip balm that has been used by others, or has previously been used on the lips.

YouTube videos show teens trying the disturbing trend, and even creating music videos promoting its prevalent use at parties.

They even brag about "Beezin" on Twitter.

@jourtn37_2oh tweeted, "beezin was such a junior year SAT move why are doctors deciding to bug about it now...."

"lol been Beezin' since before it was on the Internet," @WahWhoWah bragged in a post.

"If you're into Beezin', I know a guy who can score some premium Chapstick, bro. Pure! He gets all the best junk," @akaMikeDanger wrote.

Jokes aside, one Burt's Bees spokesman made it abundantly clear that all-natural doesn't mean harmless.

"There are lots of natural things that probably shouldn't go in eyes - dirt, twigs, leaves, food - and our lip balm," a company spokesperson quipped in a statement to the New York Daily News.

Cauthen cautioned parents, emphasizing teens should be monitored regarding their use of the lip balm.

"Our big message is natural does not equate with safety," Cauthen concluded.

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