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Man In 'Moose Riding' Incident Faces Charges

Jul 02, 2016 02:49 AM EDT
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Moose
Male moose relaxing in the forest
(Photo : Pixabay/tpsdave/Creative Commons)

Suspects in the viral "moose riding" video have been finally charged after a year.

On a Facebook post, Conservation Officer Service revealed that their investigation showed that the two males from Fort St. John in British Columbia, Canada, have been charged with three offences under The Wildlife Act: harassing wildlife with the use of a boat, attempting to capture wildlife and hunting big game that is swimming.

News Vancouver reported that the suspects are Bradley Crook and Jaysun Pinkerton. The two makes were tracked down after the body of water in the video was identified as Tuchodi Lake, approximately 120 kilometers southwest of Fort Nelson.

On June 2015, a shirtless man wearing striped shorts was filmed riding on the back of a moose. The video showed the moose helplessly wading in the water as a man on a boat driven by another individual made their way closer to the animal.

Several people can be heard laughing from the boat.

The video which was posted on Youtube by Wolfcracker T received flak and was criticized by animal activists.

Winnipeg Free Press said the two are set to make their first court appearance on August 8 in Fort Nelson.

The largest members of the deer family, moose are considered as one of Canada's most treasured symbols. Because they are naturally tall and big, they feed on branches and twigs. Their primary predators are bears and wolves.

According to National Wildlife Federation, a moose's typical lifespan is 10 to 12 years, but they can live more than 20 years in the wild. They usually inhabit forested areas with cold climate. Moose also enjoy streams and ponds, as they are great swimmers. National Geographic noted that they can stay completely under for the water for 30 seconds or more.

Hunting and habitat degradation are major threats to moose, but the increase in temperature due to global warming is now affecting their population, most specifically those in Minnesota.

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