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Finally! April the Giraffe's Baby Is Born: Here's Everything You Need to Know About the Celebrity Calf

Apr 17, 2017 04:30 AM EDT
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Giraffe Calf
April the giraffe's baby boy finally has a name. Meet Tajiri.
(Photo : Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images)

Finally, April the Giraffe has given birth to her most anticipated calf. And it's a male!

Animal lovers and April the giraffe's fans have devoted months of their time watching April's every move since Animal Adventure Park has put up a live stream video showing the 15-year-old giraffe's pregnancy journey.

Prior to the calf's birth on Saturday at around 10 a.m., many people had questioned whether April the giraffe's labor is just an April Fool's prank. ABC7NY noted that April was pregnant for 16 months, just over the normal gestation time for a giraffe. The gestation period of giraffes is 13 to 15 months.

Here's everything you need to know about April the giraffe and her calf's momentous moment.

According to CNN, at the time of the birth, 1.25 million people were watching Animal Adventure Park's giraffe cam.

  1. As quite expected, the baby's front hooves came out first, followed by the snout.
  2. Less than an hour after the calf was born, it started to stand up on its legs while April assisted him.
  3. Animal Adventure Park confirmed that the calf weighs 129 pounds (58.5 kilograms) and stands 5 feet 9 inches tall (1.75 meters).
  4. The birth of April's calf marks the first time a calf has been born at Animal Adventure Park.
  5. April will raise her calf naturally, and weaning could take between six to 10 months.
  6. Animal Adventure Park currently has a fund-raising contest to name the newborn. Here's how you can pitch your own suggestion.

Before the calf's birth, there were already fund-generating means launched by Animal Adventurr Park -- an apparel line and a GoFundMe page -- reportedly to properly take care of the mother-baby giraffes.

Giraffe population has been declining over the years and they are now listed as "vulnerable" to extinction. Their population has plunged from as many as 163,000 in 1985 to just over 97,000 last year, International Union for Conservation of Nature reported.

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