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Scientists Rediscover 'Mysterious' Sea Blob Sighted 100 Years Ago

Dec 07, 2016 08:24 AM EST
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A mythical sea blob, which has been first sighted more than a century ago, has finally been discovered by scientists in Monterey Bay. There are archives of recordings from various scientists from the early 1900s who described a tiny, orb-like creature found in the sea that looks similar to a small jellyfish. However, there had been no accompanying specimens for the findings, a reason for scientists to pass it off either as a mythical creature or a creature that has then been extinct.

There is a long list of mythical creatures that actually roamed the Earth but have been imagined and described in literature quite differently. Scientists have just assumed that the century-old recordings may have just described the creature a little differently from what it actually looks like -- a feat quite common in those days.

The Bathocordaeus Charon is a small translucent, sea invertebrate has been identified near Monterey, California. According to a report from Live Science, this specific "sea blob" belongs to the group larvaceans which are tiny creatures that can be as small as a few millimetres. The original description from a century ago, has described a certain species of larvacean which is larger than its normal size. Since large-sized larvaceans which can be as big as a few hundred millimetres are very uncommon, what has been described  is much more difficult to find.

According to the study of Sherlock, Waiz and Robison, the study which has described the creature indicated that its tail was about 75 millimeters in length. The study has also described a few things about the way these small creatures live. They are filter feeders which have a tadpole-like body that live in a small blob called a "house." The house serves as an inner filter which lets appropriately sized food to come along for the larvacean. When large particles get stuck in the filter, the larvacean simply "moves" houses, abandoning its now-dysfunctional blob and transferring to a new, working one. 

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