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Morocco May Be the New Leader of Climate Change Mitigation, Experts Say

Nov 21, 2016 06:02 AM EST
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Morocco may be the next world leader of renewable energy

(Photo : Getty Images)

It is evident that the world is suffering from the extreme side effects of climate change. With sea ice at record lows and world temperatures at record high, it is now the time for nations all over the world to transition into a "greener" state. For the past few years, experts and scientists have been lobbying for the full changeover of countries' energy generation from methods with carbon emissions to renewable energy. According to experts, Morocco may be the next leader of this "green" world.

Renewable energy is reportedly taking off in Morocco, and this is most certainly true. Evidence include the different farms and plants that the country has constructed over the years. In 2014, the country opened the largest wind farm in the whole of Africa. Then in 2016, they opened the world's largest concentrated solar plant aimed at making Morocco a solar superpower.

The country also has very stringent efforts to keep warming below the set threshold, giving it a very prestigious rating. It has even revised its current constitution to incorporate sustainable development by not only introducing renewable energy but also making it competitive in the market. Morocco has made efforts in reducing its wastes through various methods and has banned the use and the production of plastics in its local markets. Furthermore, it transformed its mosques into using renewable energy. This not only makes it change politically and socially but culturally as well.

Morocco is the only non-European nation that ranked among the top 20 in the 2016 Climate Change Performance Index. Experts say that the statistics are looking up for Morocco, and even if the country is still highly dependent on exported energy, it is expected that it will be able to significantly reduce its carbon emissions in five years.  

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