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'Drone Hunter' Saves Dubai Airport From Security Breaches

Nov 06, 2016 07:47 AM EST
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The latest in technology has given rise to the newest version of remote control planes -- drones. More than just toys, they are high-technology, multi-function devices that are not only enjoyable for the young but for the kid-at-heart as well.

On the other hand, there had been quite a number of problems that came about since the increase in popularity of these remote-control toys. According to reports, among the main problems caused by these RC devices are security issues from "stray drones" that are flying around or near protected places, which include prisons, airports, and government-protected locations. This is a tricky issue which can cause significant unwanted damage or, worst, loss of lives. According to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, there has been a dramatic increase of near misses between drones and airplanes since 2014.

The latest in all these rogue drone situations would be security breaches in Dubai International Airport. The problem is, according to experts, owners of high-powered drones want to test out how far their units can go without realizing that they have strayed beyond allowable airspace. Being one of the busiest airports in the world, Dubai International Airport can lose millions for "harmless" drones flying into their airspace.

In response to this, authorities will deploy what they call as the "drone hunter." Ironically, this "drone hunter" is a drone itself and will serve as a bounty hunter for "illegal drones." This operation will use thermal and infrared imaging to detect any unmanned air vehicle (UAV) which may cause shut-down operations in the airport. Once the hunter has targeted a stray drone, it will follow the tiny aircraft to its owner and will automatically give the police the coordinates. After which, the police will take over.

Meanwhile, the he Dutch Police faces a similar scenario, but instead of drones, they plan to deploy well-trained eagles to intercept any unrecognizable UAVs.

To date, no reports have been indicated regarding possible cases and offenses to be faced by the rogue drone owners.

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