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Rare Catch: Monster 14-Pound Lobster Accidentally Caught Near Bermuda

Oct 20, 2016 04:03 AM EDT
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Giant Lobster
After Hurricane Nicole, a massive 14-pound lobster was caught near Bermuda.
(Photo : Wikimedia Commons/John Fielding)

After Hurricane Nicole, a massive 14-pound lobster was caught near Bermuda, Q13Fox reported.

Additional reports said the lucky fisherman identified as Tristan Loescher accidentally hooked the rare crustacean when he was fishing for a snapper. Facebook Page Sanctuary Marine Bermuda shared a photo of the lobster on Facebook.

"Hurricane Nicole blew in some sea monsters," the post read.

Hurricane Nicole reached speeds of around 115mph and wreaked havoc through parts of the Caribbean, Mirror reported.

While the Sanctuary Marine Bermuda crew revealed that they almost put the crustacean to the aquarium, Mirror said that the giant lobster, was released safely back into the ocean after Loescher took photos of it.

Meanwhile, the age of the lobster was not identified, but marine experts estimate that it is already 70 years old.

Maine Lobster Institute said it takes 5 to 7 years for a lobster to grow to the legal size to harvest. A lobster at minimum legal size will weight approximately 1 pound. Based on scientific knowledge of body size at age, lobsters may live up to 100 years. Lobsters can grow to be 3 feet or more in overall body length.

Q13 Fox reported that the biggest lobster ever caught on record weighs more than 44 pounds. It was caught off of Nova Scotia, Canada in 1977.

National Geographic notes that the lobster caught off Bermuda is most likely a Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus), a rare species that lives in warm water and lacks claws. Despite this, it is known to have a strong magnetic sense because it is believed to have tiny chunks of magnetic iron.

IUCN said that although Caribbean spiny lobster is data deficient, but it is unlikely a threatened species. The population decrease can be greatly attributed to a disease (PAV1) which effects one in four in the Caribbean.

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