naturewn.com

Trending Topics NASA Mars climate change global warming ESA

Batman, Superman or Wolverine? This is the Strongest Superhero According to Science

Oct 14, 2016 04:20 AM EDT
Auction Of Superman Suit In Melbourne - Preview
A group of students from the University of Leicester in the U.K. has taken it up into themselves to solve the age-old debate on who is the strongest superhero by using scientific principles.
(Photo : Mark Dadswell/Getty Images)

A group of students from the University of Leicester in the U.K. has taken it up into themselves to solve the age-old debate on who is the strongest superhero by using scientific principles.

According to the study, in the battle of superheroes, Superman has the greatest chance to emerge victorious. The study even detailed the amount of energy produced by Superman during a superflare and applied the Law of Energy Conservation. The students also debunked comic book claims that Superman could fly for over eight hours at constant altitude.

The study said, "But, assuming he absorbs energy like a solar cell, Superman couldn’t possibly take in enough sunlight to power this flight (-) - unless disobeying the law of conservation of energy and having a staggeringly impossible solar cell efficiency of 656000% were within his superhero capabilities."

Read: Elon Musk Hires Superhero Costume Designer to Create "Badass" Spacesuits for SpaceX Mars Mission

Meanwhile, other superheroes that were deemed powerful in the study were Thor, Mystique, Wolverine and Black Bolt from "Inhuman." However, Batman fans might be disappointed to know that their masked superhero was considered as "the most ill-equipped of all the superheroes," according to a report from Nerdist.

The study also questioned Batman's ability to fly and its trajectory, saying that it's impossible for Batman to have a safe landing when he is flying from such a high velocity.

"Using a cape to glide/travel is not safe -> especially when he reaches ground level as his velocity (based on the ‘Batman Begins’ Batman and cape) can be 80km/hr once the velocity has plateaued (from an initial velocity of 110km/hr) which is FATAL," the study wrote. "Therefore he would still need a parachute for safe landing."

Do you agree with the results? To learn more about the study, check out the results and charts here.

© 2016 NatureWorldNews.com All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

© Copyright 2016 NATURE WORLD NEWS All rights reserved.
About Us Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms&Conditions
Real Time Analytics