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Birds vs Technology: 'Police' Eagles Trained to Take Down Hostile Drones

Sep 16, 2016 05:25 AM EDT
Eagle
Eagles will work as a team with agents from Dutch National Police, where the raptors will fly and take down hostile drones.
(Photo : Nancy1730)

North American eagles are now highly trained to take down hostile drones. These eagles were trained by the Dutch National Police to help them take down drones that are possible threats.

According to Live Science, the eagles learned not only taking it down, but also taking the drone far away from crowds. In a statement issued by the dutch police last Sept. 13, training eagles and taking them in as part of its roster for drone defense is a first in the world. It is the only police force in the world that made this initiative.

News agency Agence France-Presse released a video report about the inception of including eagles as part of counter-measures against hostile drones.

Michel Baeten, an operational manager for the DNP remarked that aside from using electromagnetic pulses and laser technology as methods to combat drones, birds of prey is one of the most effective counter-measures. He also mentioned that when they first gave this idea of training eagles to be part of the police force, they got a lot of reactions from all over the world. Most of them are fascinated with the idea.

The eagles that are "recruited" are still young, with wingspans that measure about 3.3 feet (1 meter) long. It is expected that when they are fully grown, their wings will be between 5.9 and 7.5 feet (1.8 and 2.3 m), and the young recruits will be ready to fly for action for about six months.

To make eagles highly-trained raptors, DNP collaborated with Guard from Above, a private company that are skilled in training raptors to take down drones. DNP already tested the eagles' abilities against flying drones and they were successful with it. The eagles, together with agents, will work as a team. Agents will need to have gloves though, as eagle talons are "extremely sharp."

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