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Watch: Drone Captures Rare Clip of Whales Preying on Shark

May 12, 2016 07:20 AM EDT
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A drone hobbyist has captured a rare footage of whale pod hunting down a shark, which is known to be the sea's most feared predator.

Bruno Kataoka stumbled upon the amazing chase down off the coast of Sydney's Cronulla beach.

"National Geographic guys have been waiting months to get such a thing and we just happened to be there at the right moment at the right time," told Seven News in an interview.

The video shows the false killer whales, between three to five meters long, chasing after the shark, tiring it out until they can finally attack it by grabbing and dragging it into the depths of the ocean.

According to Marine experts, the species which hunted down the shark is called a false killer whale which beongs to the family of dolphin. The fourth largest member of the family, Marinebio.org said they have long lumbar vertebrae that make them fast and agile. Their body form enables them to be active swimmers.

False killer whales tend to prefer deeper, warmer water and tropical oceans and it is seldom that they come in Sydney's waters. False killer whales are predatory mammals that feed mainly on the day and they usually hunt for squids and larger fishes.

Laura Kloepper, a PhD student at the University Hawaii, together with her team conducted a study about the feeding behavior of false killer whales and found out that they use "echolocation" where in they focus sound beams of the prey.

"It makes sense because echolocating is how [these animals] make their living, and during deep dives, they have very little light. So this means they can follow and track fish just by using sound," Kloepper told BBC.

Conservationists say they might be extinct soon because of their genetic defects. In addition, because of isolated sightings not much is known about this species.

Meanwhile, the official whale-watching season kicks off in two weeks in Sydney. Some 20,000 humpback whales are expected to pass.

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