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Consuming Full-Fat Dairy Products Effective Against Diabetes and Obesity

Apr 10, 2016 09:56 AM EDT
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The sudden prevalence of diabetes caused by the increase of obese people in the world got researchers tied up doing their best to discover effective prevention techniques and treatment to stop the rising trend.

On that note, two studies were done proving the effectiveness of consuming full-fat dairy products for the prevention of developing diabetes and battling obesity.

This contradicts the 2015 to 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans that recommends low-fat or no-fat dairy products over the full-fat ones.

The first study published in the journal Circulation found out that people consuming full-fat products have 44 percent reduced risk in developing diabetes.

For the study, researchers analyzed the blood from 3,333 adults from 1989 to 1990 and 1993 to 1994 as a baseline.

During the course of the 15-year study, researchers analyzed the blood taken from the participants and searched for biomarkers of full-fat diet.

They then discovered that people with high levels of the biomarkers are less susceptible to developing diabetes than those who have lower levels.

For the second study published in the American Journal of Nutrition, it showed that among the 18,438 middle-aged healthy women in the Women's Health Study, those who consumed more high-fat reduced their risk in being overweight and obese by 8 percent.

According to a report from Times, people are urged to substitute full-fat dairy with the low-fat ones to reduce the amount of unhealthy fats and cholesterol in the body.

The idea is really simple, but it may have backfired a little because people started loading up carbohydrates to compensate for the missing fats.

The body converts carbohydrates into sugar, which in turn is converted into fats.

"Our findings suggest that national guidelines that focus only on low-fat dairy should be re-examined, allowing flexibility for individual consumers to select either whole or reduced fat milk, cheese, and yogurt," Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy and the lead author of the first study, told CBS News.

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