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Exotic Gooseberries Revealed To Have Surprisingly High Antioxidant Concentration, Researchers Say

Oct 16, 2015 03:38 PM EDT
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Health professionals routinely sing the praises of dark berries – in particular, blueberries and cranberries – due to their antioxidants that help prevent the damaging effects of cell oxidation. And cranberries have long been linked to good cardiovascular and urinary tract health – and even for their ability to slow the progression of some cancerous tumors. Now health researchers are suggesting we add a new berry and much more powerful berry to our diets: Ceylon gooseberries

To better understand the health benefits of these exotic fruits, researchers from the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), took a closer look at those growing in the southwest tropics of Brazil and found that the skin and pulp have much higher antioxidants than blueberries and cranberries, according to their news release about the study. Similar to cranberries, Gooseberries contain high levels of phytochemicals, which are known to prevent oxidative stress that results in cancer and heart disease.  

Ceylon gooseberries are popular in Israel, the U.S., Central America and South Africa where they grow in warm temperatures and humid soils. They fruit blossoms in a pale green or orange color but darkens to a purple when it is fully ripened. Ceylon gooseberries can also be eaten fresh, although they tend to be quite bitter which is why they are often combined with sugar for jams, drinks and baked goods. Food manufacturers are also exploring using the berry as a natural and healthful food coloring.

The IFT is the first to identify the nutritional composition and antioxidant capacity of gooseberry fruit. Their findings were recently published in the Journal of Food Science.  

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