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5 Breathtaking 'Game of Thrones' Locations You Should Visit

May 09, 2016 10:57 AM EDT

"Game of Thrones" Season 6 Episode 3 has just ended, and right now, we're all aware that Jon Snow is not dead. The former lord commander of the Knight's Watch has ended his watch in a gruesome, heart-wrenching gesture. However, it's not just the story, brilliantly penned by George R.R. Martin, that has captured the hearts of GOT fans. It's also the stunning film locations that the team behind "Game of Thrones" has thoroughly searched to bring life to the famous story.

We've spruced up five breathtaking "Game of Thrones" locations that every GOT-loving wanderer should visit.

1. Dubrovnik, Croatia

Our journey begins where the iron throne lies -- Westeros. Dubrovnik in Croatia was chosen as the set for King's Landing for its strategic location and impeccable architecture. The said place is on a peninsula surrounded by thick stone walls. Dubrovnik, according to Sky Scanner, offers more than just architecture, it's also a place where history and beach life meet.

GOT travelers can taste a hint of history from monuments dating back from the Roman, Byzantine, Venetian and Austro-Hungarian eras while exploring nature in Dubrovnik's rugged mountains and pristine white sand beaches such as the Elafiti Islands. You can also take a boat and enjoy the turqoiuse waters of Plitvice Lakes, Croatia's national park.

2. Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland offers a lot of stunning "Game of Thrones" locations from Castle Ward (Winterfell), Tollymore Forest Park (Forests in the North), Mussenden Temple and Downhill Beach (Dragonstone) and Ballintoy Harbour (Lordsport).

However, the most stunning of all is The Dark Hedges (The Road from King's Landing). Located on Bregagh Road in the small Northern Iceland town of Ballymoney, The Dark Hedges is a magical avenue of old beech trees planted by the Stuart family way back in the 18th century.

If you can remember, Kingsroad is where Ned Stark and his daughters, Sansa and Arya, first went on their journey to Kings Landing, where the catastrophic events for the whole Stark family started.

3. Spain

If you're a die-hard GOT fan, Spain offers a lot of filming locations from the famous HBO series. One of which is Alcazaba of Almeria (Dorne) in the southern coast of Spain. This walled fortress was built in 955 to protect not only the seat of government back then, but also civilian houses, squares and a mosque.

Also located in Spain is the Bardenas Reales, Navarre (Dothraki Sea), which features an amazing desert landscape with rock formations. Here, Daenerys Targaryen meets a Dothraki tribe where she is held captive. What will happen to Khaleesi and her dragons have not yet been revealed, but we'll surely see more of Bardenas Reales Natural Park in the next episodes of "Game of Thrones" Season 6.

Spain also houses one of the most intriguing places among "Game of Throne" fans, the Tower of Joy or Zafra Castle, Guadalajara. This is where Lyanna Stark died. In the latest episode of "Game of Thrones," we had a sneak peek of the famous Tower of Joy; however, believers of the R+L=J theory might wait a little longer to see if their speculations are true.

4. Morocco

Witness where Daenerys Targaryen broke chains and freed the slaves as well as her rise to power in Morocco. Aït-Ben-Haddou, a fortified city located in Southeast Marrakech, is the location of Yunkai and Pentos. As per Sky Scanner, it was also the location of other hit films such as "The Mummy" and "Gladiator." Also in Morocco is Essaouira (Astapor), which, in real life, has attracted tourists for its chill beach life and abundant fresh seafood.

5. Iceland

From the warm weather of Morocco, we now travel to the colder landscape of Iceland to follow the tracks of Jon Snow and the wildlings. The vast mountain area of Vatnajökull is the location for North of the Wall, where White Walkers stroll in undeadly fashion. In real life, though, Vatnajökull is the largest national park in Europe.

If you're eager to see where Jon and Ygritte made love, head to the mystical cave of Grjótagjá, which is a small lava cave in Northeast Iceland. The cave houses a thermal spring and is a popular bathing cave in the 1970s.

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